Words About Steve Ross

 

"WHEN STEVE SINGS, NEW YORK IS NEW YORK AGAIN"
- MICHAEL FEINGOLD, THE VILLAGE VOICE

"ASTAIRE STYLE WITH WRY ASIDE STRIKING COMIC GOLD"
- STEPHEN HOLDEN, THE NEW YORK TIMES

"AN ASTAIRE-WAY TO PARADISE!  YOUR CABARET SEASON IS
INCOMPLETE WITHOUT THIS VISIT WITH STEVE ROSS."

- PETER HAAS, CABARET SCENES


"FRED ASTAIRE MUST BE DANCING ON HEAVEN'S CEILING...
STEVE ROSS IS AN AMERICAN CABARET TREASURE"

-   
BARBARA AND SCOTT SIEGEL, THEATERMANIA.COM


"...Steve Ross is such a master at putting a debonair spin on Cole Porter and Noel Coward's musical high jinks that his persona is that of a sophisticated party entertainer who holds off the blues with a froth of wit. But there is an introspective side to Mr. Ross that has increasingly peeked out in his recent cabaret performances...In his wonderful new show, 'Love and Laughter, Part I'...the humor is balanced by songs that have the feel of wistful sighs." Steven Holden, New York Times. April, 2000.

"...he shares (Noel) Coward's refinement and air of nostalgia. And this survey of Coward's songs, embracing nearly four decades of work, skillfully touches every base, from stiff-upper-lip patriotism ("London Pride") to sentimental sing-alongs ("I'll Follow My Secret Heart"), to pricelessly witty show business numbers ("Mrs. Worthington"). Amusing biographical anecdotes flesh out an affectionate musical portrait." Steven Holden, New ork Times. October, 1999.

"As long as Steve Ross performs (Cole Porter and Noel Coward) songs, the reputations of these great songwriting wits can only continue to soar... Mr. Ross is a master of the light touch. His songs are partly spoken, partly sung, in a buoyant conversational voice with an attitude of dry, slightly supercilious amusement. The pattery melodies ride on breezy piano figures that lend the material a lilting merry-go-round energy." Steven Holden, New York Times, February, 1999.

"Think of Cary Grant and Irene Dunne reincarnated as a vocal duo, and you'll have some notion of the flavor of "LAmour, the Merrier!," a delightful two-person revue in which Steve Ross and Karen Murphy portray a sophisticated couple loving and bickering their way through life." Stephen Holden, New York Times, November 1998.

"(Steve Ross's) engaging new show, 'Hooray for Hollywood,' which culminates in a suite of Cole Porter gems, is a poised and sophisticated tour of a bygone show-business society ruled by the bons mots of Porter, Noel Coward and Loenz Hart. It's a refreshing world to visit." Stephen Holden, New York Times, June 1998.

"Steve Ross sings in the New York cabaret style, playing the piano brilliantly and articulating every rhyme and double-entendre..." Patrick O'Connor, The Daily Telegraph, 1998

"It being impossible to resurrect Fred Astaire in white tie and tails and have him alight in the Rainbow and Stars cabaret, the singer and pianist, Steve Ross, a devoted Astaire acolyte and the suavest of all male cabaret performers, makes a delightful stand-in. His new act, 'I Won't Dance'...is a deft, fast-paced nonterpsichorean salute to the image, voice and spirit of Astaire." Stephen Holden, The New York Times, July 1997.

"Steve Ross's, 'Puttin' On the Ritz' and 'They All Laughed' were dispatched with brio, while on 'They Can't Take That Away From Me,' the slowing of the tempo and casual, bluesy ambiance were proof that Ross's range extends well beyond that of a Park Avenue dandy." Clive Davis, The Times. London, July 24, 1997.

"The very personification of the spirit of Cole Porter." The New Yorker.

"Steve Ross, the veteran cabaret singer and pianist whose show, 'I Won't Dance,' holds forth at the Ordway's McKnight Theatre through November, has Astaire's unfailing sense of rhythm and something of his compact but agile tone along with a wide range. With his hair slicked back, revealing his small, delicate features, he even looks like Astaire." Michael Anthony, Star Tribune, the Twin Cities, Oct. 7, 1997.

"...When he performed the evening's undisputed highlights, 'I Concentrate on You,' and 'In The Still of the Night,' he was in top form, singing with dramatic warmth and feeling...Ross has the perfect personality for cabaret presentation, not to mention the proper style and phrasing for these songs." Erin Hart, The Pioneer Press, St. Paul, September 27, 1997.

"Steve Ross has enticed me with his renderings of 'King' Cole. One of his greatest performances is of the title song, 'Can Can.' I so flipped over his perfect rendition that I tried to sing the ditty in my Broadway debut in 1988. I sang it okay, but couldn't begin to approach Steve's organic performance." Michael Feinstein, performer and author, Nice Work If You Can Get It, My Life in Rhythm and Rhyme.

"The best of cabaret, namely Steve Ross." Michael Buckley, TheaterWeek. 1996.

"With his debonair air, Ross is priceless with patter songs, such as 'Why Do The Wrong People Travel?'" Wayman Wong, The Daily News, March, 1994.